Forestdale Primary School

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Phonics and Reading

Here is some information about reading at Forestdale Primary.

EYFS and Infants

Children at Forestdale learn to read through a banded colour reading scheme. This is based on a range of published reading schemes such as Oxford Owl, Rigby Star and Collin’s Big Cat, Songbirds and Project X. These books include both fiction and non-fiction.

Jolly phonics and Letters and Sounds is used in Reception to teach the initial sounds and high frequency words.
Carrying on from this, in Year 1 and Year 2, we take guidance from Letters and Sounds to create our own phonics teaching structure ensuring we cover all of the aspects necessary in the teaching of phonics.
  • Monday - revision of sounds, introduction to our “sound of the week”

  • Tuesday - a reading focus - children read words and sentences containing the sound of the week

  • Wednesday - “Weird Word Wednesday” - children read and write “alien” or made-up words containing the sound of the week (in preparation for alien words that appear on the screening check.

  • Thursday - a writing focus - children write sentences with words containing the sound of the week.

  • Friday - spelling test with sound of the week words.

Alongside this structure - children also learn to read and write common exception and high frequency words within the phase they are working at.

Juniors

Children read either book band books or chapter books.

Reading at Home

Children should aim to read in out of school hours for:

  • 10 minutes in Reception and Year 1
  • 15 minutes in Year 2
  • 20 minutes in Year 3
  • 25 minutes in Year 4
  • 30 minutes in Year 5
  • 40 minutes in Year 6

Children are expected to read at least three times a week and record their reading in their home contact books. If a child reads three times or more they will receive a stamper from their teacher.

Book Band Expectations

Pink 1 - Working within Reception

  • Locate title
  • Open front cover
  • Turn pages appropriately
  • Understand that left page comes before right
  • Understand that we read print from left to right
  • Match spoken word to printed word (one-to-one correspondence)
  • Locate familiar words and use them to check own reading
  • Use the meaning of text
  • Use language patterns (syntax)
  • Predict the story line and some vocabulary

Red 2 - Working at Reception

  • Locate and recall title
  • Have secure control of one-to-one matching
  • Use known words to check and confirm reading
  • Start to read more rhythmically or use phrasing while maintaining track of print
  • Repeat words, phrases or sentences to check, confirm or modify own reading
  • Predict from meaning, syntax and print to solve new words

Yellow 3 - Working within year 1:

  • Follow print with eyes, finger-pointing only at points of difficulty
  • Take more note of punctuation to support the use of grammar and oral language rhythms
  • Cross-check all sources of information more quickly while reading
  • Note familiar words and letter clusters and use these to get to unknown words e.g. look > took
  • Search for information in print to predict, confirm or attempt new words while reading
  • Notice relationships between one text and another
  • Predict in more detail

Blue 4 - Working at year 1:

  • Move through text attending to meaning, print and sentence structure flexibly
  • Self-correct more rapidly on-the-run
  • Re-read to enhance phrasing and clarify precise meaning
  • Solve new words using print information along with attention to meaning
  • Use analogy with known vocabulary to solve new words
  • Manage a greater variety of text genre
  • Discuss content of the text in a manner which indicates precise understanding

Green 5- Working within year 2:

  • Read fluently with attention to punctuation.
  • Solve new words using print detail while attending to meaning and syntax.
  • Track visually additional lines of print without difficulty.
  • Manage effectively a growing variety of texts, including non-fiction.
  • Discuss and interpret character and plot more fully.
  • Use contents page and glossary in nonfiction books, and locate information.

Orange 6- Working at year 2:

  • Get started on fiction after briefer introductions and without relying so heavily on illustrations.
  • Examine non-fiction layout and use the contents page to select which sections of a book to read.
  • Read longer phrases and more complex sentences.
  • Blend phonemes in unfamiliar words more fluently, cross checking with meaning and syntax.
  • Attend to a greater range of punctuation and text layout.
  • Search for and use familiar syllables within words to read longer words.
  • Infer meaning from the text.
  • Check information in text with illustrations, particularly in non-fiction, and comment on content.
  • Begin to use appropriate terminology when discussing different types of text.

Turquoise 7- Working at year 2:

  • Extract meaning from the text while reading with less dependence on illustrations.
  • Approach different genres with increasing flexibility.
  • Use punctuation and text layout to read with a greater range of expression and control.
  • Sustain reading through longer sentence structures and paragraphs.
  • Tackle a higher ratio of more complex words using known vocabulary, phonic knowledge and syllables.
  • Find a way around alphabetically ordered texts such as indexes, glossaries and dictionaries.

Purple 8- Working towards year 3:

  • Look through a variety of fiction and non-fiction with growing independence to predict content and layout and story development.
  • Read silently or quietly at a more rapid pace, taking note of punctuation and using it to keep track of longer sentences.
  • Solve most unfamiliar words on the run by blending long vowel phonemes, recognising and using them in longer and more complex words.
  • Adapt to fiction, non fiction and poetic language with growing flexibility.
  • Take more conscious account of literacy effects used by fiction writers, and the formal language of different types of non-fiction.
  • Begin to make more conscious use of reading to extend speaking and writing vocabulary and syntax.

Gold 9- Working within year 3:

  • Look through a variety of books with growing independence to predict content and story development, and make full use of non fiction layout.
  • Read silently or quietly at a more rapid pace, taking note of punctuation and using it to keep track of longer sentences.
  • Solve most unfamiliar words on the run by blending long vowel phonemes, recognising and using them in longer and more complex words.
  • Adapt to fiction, non-fiction and poetic language with growing flexibility.
  • Take more conscious account of literacy effects used by writers.
  • Make more conscious use of reading to extend speaking and writing vocabulary and syntax.
  • Locate and interpret information in non fiction.

White 10- Working at year 3:

  • Read silently most of the time.
  • Sustain interest in longer text, returning to it easily after a break.
  • Use text more fully as a reference and as a model.
  • Search for and find information in texts more flexibly.
  • Notice the spelling of unfamiliar words and relate to known words.
  • Show increased awareness of vocabulary and precise meaning.
  • Express reasoned opinions about what is read, and compare texts.
  • Offer and discuss interpretations of text.

Reading with your Child

Children need to know that we read for meaning therefore these questions will ensure that they get the utmost from the book in terms of understanding and enjoyment. You may wish to record your child’s responses to the questions in their contact book. The questions get progressively harder from box 1-3.

Reading Questions Box 1

Do you know anything about this book already?

Do you know any of the characters/people in this story?

Where does the story happen?

Why do you think X [a character] did that?

Why do you think Y [an event] happened?

What do you think will happen next? How will it end?

What does the picture tell you about the information/ story?

Reading Questions Box 2

What are the most important things that happen in this book/story?

How do you know?

Why did these things happen?

What tells you that?

Has anything like this ever happened to you?

What clues in the text tell you if it is the same/ different?

How did X [a character] behave? How do you know?

How did X [a character] feel?

Which words/phrases/illustrations tell you that?

What else tells you?

How do you think the author wants us to feel at this moment?

What is she/he trying to do here?

Reading Questions Box 3

If the writer asked you what could be improved in the text, what would you say?

Why does the font change in this part of the story?

How does the dialogue help to move the story on?

Which words do you think are particularly effective?

Were there words or phrases or other things to do with the language that you liked? Or didn’t like? Explain

Do you know what the word means or can you work out what it means (in this sentence)?

What other word could the author have used that means the same sort of thing?

Questions

Library

The school has a well-stocked library, which each class visits fortnightly so the children can take out and return books. The books are updated annually.